PODCAST: The customer is always right | ThirdCoast Digest


PODCAST: The customer is always right | ThirdCoast Digest.

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Published in: on June 20, 2010 at 9:00 pm  Leave a Comment  

Happy Hour: The Jersey Girl and Semi Suite | ThirdCoast Digest


Happy Hour: The Jersey Girl and Semi Suite | ThirdCoast Digest.

Published in: on June 20, 2010 at 8:54 pm  Leave a Comment  

Peas In A Pod: Gin & Rye Cocktail


There was never a time when my grandmother couldn’t spout out an appropriate cliché for any given situation.  These candid interruptions were usually coupled with a dramatic pause and a slow drag from the cigarette that had always seemed to be hanging from the side of her mouth.  Charming.  She has since passed away, but her words (well sort of) still enter my thoughts on occasion.  I will share with you some of her favorites, then I will tie it all together in a big red bow for ya: “All’s fair in love and war.”–I have been through my fair share of relationships and listened to enough CCR to completely understand this maxim.  “Gild the lily.”–The number 1 reason I would never date a woman from Staten Island.  “Plant kindness and gather love.”–My grandmother, having buried 3 husbands, should have probably stopped incorporating this chestnut in her daily repartee.   Last, but not least…”Can’t see the forest for the trees.”–Started hearing this one early on in life, when my minor case of OCD became apparent.

Personal Interpretation and New Found Pursuit

Appreciate the detail and subtle nuance of our passions, while comprehending the full spectrum of our creative acumen.  Be unbound by the rules that govern habit and stifle innovation.  Promote stylistic independence while maintaining a simplistic integrity.  Efforts will unapologetically be weighed and measured by the products of which our hands and minds produce.

I know that turning 4 hackneyed statements and making them ones personal mission might seem a tad bit trite and dramatic to some, but you can always make the best out of the banal.

Here is a new and appropriately titled cocktail of mine, incorporating my new found trust:

New Coat of Paint

1 oz. Bombay London Dry

.75 oz. Carpano Antica Vermouth

.5 oz. Sazerac Rye 6 Year

.25 oz. Yellow Chartreuse

2 Dashes Regan’s Orange Bitters

Combine all ingredients with ice into mixing glass.  Stir, stir, stir and strain into chilled coupe glass.  Garnish with  flamed oils of an orange twist.

THANK YOU FOR READING!

Published in: on June 17, 2010 at 2:21 am  Comments (2)  

Quick Mix: Drambuie Cocktail


Recently I’ve been asked by the good people at the Bacardi Corporation to come up with a “modern twist” of the rusty nail.  The stipulations were that Drambuie and Dewer’s Scotch be at the heart of the cocktail, and to shy away from complex infusions.  Seeing as this post is going to be about the rusty nail, I will try my best to avoid any puns pertaining to geriatric sex, and any phallic references to a man hammer or wood.

Before I give you my twist, I would like to share with you my proportions on the original when Dewar’s is called:

Rusty Nail

2 oz. Dewar’s Scotch

1 oz Drambuie

2 dashes Peychaud’s Bitters

Combine all ingredients with ice into mixing glass.  Stir, stir, stir and strain over fresh ice into old  fashioned glass.  Garnish with the oils of large lemon twist.

When coming up with my new cocktail, I wanted to accomplish 3 things:

  1. Create a summer cocktail using the above mentioned ingredients. √
  2. Create a cocktail that anyone can make. (No infusions, no house-made syrups, no hard to find ingredients) √
  3. Create a Drambuie centric cocktail, with the scotch as a modifying ingredient. √

At the end of the day, my goals were met and this cocktail would have made Bonnie Prince Charlie’s back arch and toes curl.  So, without further ado, or more references to royals creaming their kilts, I give you:

Enc(rust)ed Nail

1 oz. Drambuie

.75 oz. Dewar’s White Label

.75 oz. Fresh Lemon Juice

.5 oz. Luxardo Maraschino Liqueur

3 Heavy Dashes Peychaud’s Bitters

Combine all ingredients with ice into mixing glass.  Shake and double strain into chilled coupe glass.  No garnishment necessary.

THANK YOU FOR READING!

Published in: on June 13, 2010 at 2:14 pm  Comments (3)